8 Technician and Technologist Jobs for the 21st Century

by on November 24th, 2010
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The role of the technician and technologist continues to evolve and the Department of Labor is projecting strong growth in the number of job opportunities in these occupations over the next decade. Many Technician and Technologist jobs typically require an associate’s degree for education and training. This means that interested professionals could be in one of these careers in about 2 years.

Automotive Specialty Technicians develop the expertise to repair only one system or component on a vehicle, such as brakes, suspension, or radiator. Specialized training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree are requirements to succeed in this occupation. Median wages in 2010 were $17.21 hourly.

Surgical Technologists work in healthcare facilities and assist in operations, under the supervision of surgeons, registered nurses, or other surgical personnel. These technologists may help set up operating rooms, prepare and transport patients for surgery, help handle and track equipment during surgery, and help count inventory after procedures. 27% of these technologists have an associates degree. Median wages in 2010 were $19.19 hourly.

Electrical Engineering Technicians are responsible for testing or modifying electrical machinery or electrical control equipment. Work involves circuitry in industrial or commercial plants or laboratories. In addition to formal training in a vocational program or associates degree, professionals in this career might participate in apprenticeship programs. Median wages in 2010 were $26.94 hourly.

Surveying Technicians adjust and operate surveying instruments, compile notes, make sketches and enter data into computers. This occupation is expected to have faster than average growth in the number of job opportunities for these types of technicians over the next several years. Median wages in 2010 were $18.22 hourly.

Refrigeration Technicians and Installers work to install and repair industrial and commercial refrigerating systems. Job opportunities for this occupation are expected to increase more than 20% per year over the next several years. Median wages in 2010 were $20.45 hourly.

Forensic Science Technicians collect, identify, classify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations. Job opportunities for this occupation are expected to increase at more than 20% per year over the next several years. Median wages in 2010 were $24.79 hourly.

Radiologic Technicians are responsible for maintaining and using equipment and supplies necessary to show portions of the human body on x-ray film or fluoroscopic screen for medical diagnostic purposes. 73% of Radiologic Technicians have Associates degrees. Median wages in 2010 were $18.49 hourly.

Histologic Technicians work to prepare histologic slides from tissue sections for microscopic examination and diagnosis by pathologists. Some Histo-Techs may assist in research studies. 71% of Histologic Technicians have associates or bachelor’s degrees. Median wages in 2010 were $26.98 hourly. In some states, Histologic Technicians will have to pass board registry examinations.


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