THOSE ROMAN POLITICIANS

by on February 23rd, 2011
Share Button

The undeclared war between our two major political parties are not bringing new avenues of governing but creating an ambiance of mistrust and tension. What else can you expect when one of the leaders declares openly that his only objective is to replace the current emperor?

Sue Mortimer

“Is this the way it is going to be?’

I asked the Professor referring to the push, pull and twist performance offered to us by the Democrat and Republican Parties under the mediocre shade of the White House.

The Professor shook his head sadly and replied:

“Allow me to quote a great philosopher who said, ‘If humans had been made responsible for the creation of man, they would still be arguing about whether that protein or that bacteria were the right one to get the process started!’

All I could say was:

“A good thing someone else did the job, as imperfect as the results were. Now, give me your view on this disgusting situation that has brought our government with all its pending obligations and needed resolutions to almost a complete stop.”

The professor was quick to observe:

“I think they all failed to appreciate the seriousness of the situation. On the one hand, whatever interest shown by one of the parties includes all kind of non-essential items in a clear demonstration of the erotic attraction pork has on anyone in our government. In this respect, the President and his staff have failed to remove those items that were certain to give the opposition an orgasm of rebuttals, criticism and plain ole bitching. In my opinion, I begin to detect an atmosphere in Washington reminiscent of that at the Roman Senate a couple of thousand years ago! The two main factions in the Roman Senate could roughly be compared to our Republican and Democrats, or if you wish, Conservatives and Liberals.”

I said: “That is an interesting observation, Prof. Kindly expand.”

“Happy to, sir, but before I must have a cappuccino properly escorted by those delightful apple pie biscuits that only the French can make!”

Moments later the Professor expanded, as requested:

“The Roman Senate can be blamed for the creation and institutionalization of lobbyism, pork projects, bribery, blackmail and all sort of irregularly convincing techniques that acted against the moral and ethical nature of their Senate. Their corruption reached levels that made it easier for the conquered empires, kingdoms and provinces, to set their own course and eventually led to the collapse of the empire, often being a matter of buying their own freedom. The effectiveness of the Senate as a means of control and supervision of a large empire, gradually turned into an oratory contest where the interests of the people were totally ignored.”

“How about opposition in the Roman Senate?”

“If there was a significant majority favoring one of the parties, the whole thing turned into a dictatorial exercise, something not unusual in our own coop. So the opposition developed some protection against imposed rulings and a new industry was born’

“What industry?”

‘The most common was the poisoning industry. Exotic compounds from Northern Africa became popular and could be administered easily. Then you had the use of sharp instruments, using those fine steel blades from Gallia, Iberia and Greece, and a variety of accidents that included from deadly snake bites to drowning, chariot accidents and waves of “self inflicted” hangings.”

“You better stop Professor.”

“Why? Didn’t you want to know about the Romans?”

“Yes, but I am afraid our politicians might get some ideas if they read this!”

copyright©marco miranda sr.


Prev Article: »
Next Article: «

Related Articles