Home > Cancer >

Can cancer be spread by sexual contact

Health related question in topics Conditions Illness .We found some answers as below for this question "Can cancer be spread by sexual contact",you can compare them.

Cancer cannot be spread by sexual contact. Cancer is caused by deformities in the cells. It is unknown why this occurs. ChaCha! [ Source: http://www.chacha.com/question/can-cancer-be-spread-by-sexual-contact ]
More Answers to "Can cancer be spread by sexual contact"
Can Breast Cancer Spread By Sexual Contact?
http://www.blurtit.com/q517891.html
Cancer isn't contagious, so no you can't get it from someone that has it. Hope this helps.
What exactly is cervical cancer? Is it caused by sexual contact o...?
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080113210447AAbCO5y
most will say that cervical cancer is caused by the HPV virus, but this is a medical myth. HPV has never been proven to cause cervical cancer. Mind you that HPV (human pappilomavirus) usually clears up on it's own, so if you want to test on...
Is it possible that liver cancer can transfer to another person t...?
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080723004115AAjyX9z
It is not the cancer that is transfered but what causing it. If it is because of hepatitis, then the hepatitis that will be transmitted. there is a probability. So you have to know the initial cause of her liver cancer first.

Related Questions Answered on Y!Answers

Question for pro-choice folks regarding the HPV vaccine?
Q: I understand that several states have already mandated this vaccine for young girls. It is supposed to protect against some forms of cervical cancer caused by STD's. It is very expensive ($300 per shot and you need 3 boosters) and insurances are not covering the full costs. Long term side effects are not yet known.My question for pro-choice people is: isn't this "the government telling us what to do with our bodies?" Why can't my daughter choose abstinence and not get the shot? We are not talking about a disease spread by casual contact. We are talking about a disease spread by sexual contact and there are a lot of opinions about sexual contact, particularly outside of marriage. I don't think it's the gov'ts place to mandate this. Isn't this an infingement on "choice?"Well, there are a lot of good points made here. For those of you who are using terms like right-wing nut job and bible thumper, I can't understand why. I have made no reference to religion here; I am talking about choice, and aren't most people on the "left" all about choice?As for BarB, no I wouldn't get a shot preventing testicular cancer--I am FEMALE, FYI, so your hostile assumption is wrong.I think it's a valid point for the vaccine that while a woman might choose abstinence, her future partner might have not...I also think that Merck is pushing this mandate just to line their pockets. They are the only company which produces it. I think they are playing on people's health warnings to make a buck.I still feel this is an infringement on choice. This is not the same as a disease like Meales or chicken pox which is spread by casual contact that may not be avoidable unless you live in a bubble.
A: Not a pro-choice in your sense but pro choice in you do not have to sleep with someone & get pregnant. I agree, I would go to court before I allow a virtually untested & unneccessary vaccine to be given to my child. This cancer can only occur from STD illness. It is a waste of taxpayer's money & an invasion of family rights.
Questions about STDs?
Q: According to the National Institute of Allergies & Infectious Diseases, Human Papillomavirus is among the most common causes of sexually transmitted infections in the world.(1) In the United States, it is estimated that there are more cases of genital human papillomavirus infections than any other sexually transmitted diseases; indeed, according to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 20 million people are currently infected and at least 50% of sexually active men and women acquire a genital HPV infection at some point in their lives. The CDC estimates that by age 50, at least 80% of women will have acquired a genital HPV infection, and about 6.2 million Americans get a new genital HPV infection each year.(2) There are more than 100 different strains of HPV, as it is commonly referred to, most of which are harmless. However, an estimated 30 types of HPV are spread through sexual contact; some of which can cause genital warts.(3) Also called condylomata acuminata or venereal warts, genital warts typically appear in “clusters” of bumps. The warts can appear either as raised or flat and range in size from small to large. Common locations for the warts in women include the vulva, cervix, and inside and surrounding the vagina and anus. Genital warts typically appear on the scrotum or penis in men who are affected. The warts are highly contagious and can easily be spread during vaginal or anal sex with an infected partner. Rarely, genital warts also can develop in the mouth or throat after having oral sex with an infected partner. Genital HPV infections often do not have any symptoms; however, even without obvious symptoms, HPV can still be spread from partner to partner. Warts are usually diagnosed, even in absence of symptoms, by sight. Gynecologists can confirm the diagnosis in suspected cases by applying acetic acid (vinegar) to the infected areas, causing the areas to whiten and making the warts more visible. Abnormal Pap Smears can also result in the presence of a cervical HPV infection. There is no cure for HPV. There are, however, treatments for the warts, including topical agents such as Imiquimod, Podophyllin Antimitotic solution, Podofilox, Fluorouracil cream and Trichloroacetic acid. Genital warts can also be removed surgically through cryosurgery, which freezes them, electrocautery, which burns them, or laser. As there is no cure for human papillomavirus, the warts may come back even after definitive treatment. HPV is more than just an STD. Some forms of the virus can actually can cause cancers of the cervix, vulva, anus, and penis.(4) Genital warts can also cause problems during pregnancy, ranging from vaginal obstruction to the development of warts in the throat of the infant (laryngeal papillomatosis).(5) Early diagnosis and intervention in a patient with genital warts are crucial for successful treatment. According to the University of Iowa Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, there are three ways to decrease exposure to HPV and other sexually transmitted diseases: use of condoms, which can lower the risks of exposure; monogamous relationships; and complete abstinence.(6) The University is currently conducting important research towards a possible vaccine through their study on HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. For more information or to participate, please see http://obgyn.uihc.uiowa.edu/futureii.htm... Source(s):from http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1037.h... and http://www.associatedcontent.com/content...
A: yep HPV SUCKS!!! and it sucks that people dont really know about it....but more people should read about it because it is soo common among women....
should circumcision be banned???NO?
Q: Dr. Muhammad 'Ali al-Baar (a member of the Royal College of Surgeons in the UK and a consultant to the Islamic Medicine department of the King Fahd Centre for Medical Research in the King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah) says in his book al-Khitaan (Circumcision): "Circumcision of newborn boys (I.e., within the first month of life) brings numerous health benefits, including: 1 – Protection against local infection in the penis, which may result from the presence of the foreskin, causing tightening of the foreskin, which may lead to retention of urine or infections of the glans (tip) of the penis – which require circumcision in order to treat these problems. In chronic cases, the child may be exposed to numerous diseases in the future, the most serious of which is cancer of the penis. 2 – Infections of the urethra. Many studies have proven that uncircumcised boys are more exposed to infection of the urethra. In some studies the rate was 39 times more among uncircumcised boys. In other studies the rate was ten times more. Other studies showed that 95% of children who suffered from infections of the urethra were uncircumcised, whereas the rate among circumcised children did not exceed 5%. In children, infection of the urethra is serious in some cases. In the study by Wisewell on 88 children who suffered infections of the urethra, in 36 % of them, the same bacteria was found in the blood also. Three of them contracted meningitis, and two suffered renal failure. Two others died as a result of the spread of the micro-organisms throughout the body. 3 – Protection against cancer of the penis: the studies agree that cancer of the penis is almost non-existent among circumcised men, whereas the rate among uncircumcised men is not insignificant. In the US the rate of penile cancer among circumcised men is zero, whilst among uncircumcised men it is 2.2 in every 100,000 of the uncircumcised population. As most of the inhabitants of the US are circumcised, the cases of this cancer there are between 750 and 1000 per year. If the population were not circumcised, the number of cases would reach 3000. In countries where boys are not circumcised, such as China, Uganda and Puerto Rico, penile cancer represents between 12-22 % of all cancers found in men; this is a very high percentage. 4 – Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Researchers found that the STDs which are transmitted via sexual contact (usually because of fornication/adultery and homosexuality) spread more among those who are not circumcised, especially herpes, soft chancres, syphilis, candida, gonorrhea and genital warts. There are numerous modern studies which confirm that circumcision reduces the possibility of contracting AIDS when compared to their uncircumcised counterparts. But that does not rule out the possibility of a circumcised man contracting AIDS as the result of sexual contact with a person who has AIDS. Circumcision is not a protection against it, and there is no real way of protecting oneself against the many sexually transmitted diseases apart from avoiding fornication/adultery, promiscuity, homosexuality and other repugnant practices. (From this we can see the wisdom of Islamic sharee'ah in forbidding fornication/adultery and homosexuality). 5 – Protection of wives against cervical cancer. Researchers have noted that the wives of circumcised men have less risk of getting cervical cancer than the wives of uncircumcised men. Health Benefits taken from: al-Khitaan, p. 76, by Dr. Muhammad al-Baar. And Allah knows best.hi bro..what so great about american..u guys just refuse to accept the fact
A: Both Jews and Muslims have circumcision as a religious requirement but this is actually at heart a health matter which has been religionised after its major benefits were realised millennia ago.Modern medicine has proved time and again that circumcision provides life-long benefits in terms of reduced risk of several STIs plus elimination of the common problems of phimosis, paraphimosis, frenulum breve and balanoposthitis.Circumcision is the right of every male for its medical benefits, as is their ability to practice their religion in peace. Both as a human rights matter and for the medical benefits it brings to both the man himself and to his sexual partners, it would be totally immoral to even attempt to ban it. On the contrary, it is the duty of government to promote health and thus they should be promoting voluntary circumcision for all males at their own request or that of their caring parents.
TOP


Prev Question: Has anyone ever lived from terminal cancer
Next Question:

People also view
  • Can cancer be spread by sexual contact
  • Has anyone ever lived from terminal cancer
  • Will ingesting plastic kill you
  • What are all the signs **
  • What day did audrey hepburn die
  • What Does soy lecithin
  • Can testicular cancer show up in a blood test if I had it
  • What is Oral Cancer and how do you get it
  • What year was the chernobil nuclear explosion
  • What has proven to be the most effective treatment for oral cancer