Santorum: Faith Vs. Record

by on January 18th, 2011
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As the Republican primary continues to traipse the candidates, Rick Santorum has conjured a common theme that always resonates with the conservative base – the divine approval of Jesus the Christ of Nazareth. Mr. Santorum extolls the virtues of adhering to the principles of Christian life and encourages the electorate, just as George W. Bush did, to base their vote on the sound judgment of “faith.” It is rather perturbing that voters can disregard reasoning and render a decision based upon religious-oriented rhetoric. Our nation was, in part, founded upon a very rudimentary concept that arose from the religious persecution of the chimerical divinity to which the royal families of Europe so desperately clinged. The more we allow our secular government to be consumed by the profane, the further we distance ourselves from the ideals of democracy.

The notion that a candidate guided by religion is more qualified or balanced or moral than an atheist is completely asinine. Morality and atheism are not mutually exclusive. One’s morality should not come from extraneous sources, such as church, but should develop from the nurturing of family and an inherent moral compass. In fact, religion has often conflicted with the concept of self-preservation. The belief in an afterlife mitigates the fear of death, resulting in extreme or irrational behavior. The behaviors may exist in a microcosm – a father physically and/or verbally abuses his daughter who engaged in premarital sex – or the behaviors may exist in a global scale – the Cold War (arms race), Al Qaida, or even the current tensions with Iran. Conversely, an atheist is far more likely to behave in a rational manner because he or she contends that nothing exists beyond this world; thus, an atheist exponentially values life more than those who base their lives on religion.

The intention here is not to deride those who live a pious life. It is merely to question the methods of which many Republican voters cast their ballots. The surge of Rick Santorum compelled me to broach the idea of voting-by-faith. The voting record of Mr. Santorum is an indictment of his qualifications for president, yet he still maintains a vast number of voters all predicated on the fact that he is a “Christian.”

Rick Santorum voted NO to increase tax deductions for college tuition

Rick Santorum voted YES to reduced taxes for capital gains

Rick Santorum voted NO to repeal capital gains tax cuts

Rick Santorum voted NO on funding smaller classroom sizes

Rick Santorum voted NO on shifting $11 billion in corporate tax loopholes to education

Rick Santorum voted NO to grants to local educational agencies

Rick Santorum votes YES to fund abstinence education

… Essentially, Rick Santorum votes YES to aiding venture capitals maintain their wealth and votes NO to improving education.

Rick Santorum voted NO for adding sexual orientation to hate crimes

Rick Santorum voted YES on loosening restrictions on cell phone wiretapping

Rick Santorum voted NO on repealing tax subsidy for companies which move U.S. jobs offshore

Rick Santorum voted YES to kill an increase in minimum wage

Rick Santorum voted NO on including oil and gas smokestacks in mercury regulations

Rick Santorum voted NO on a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

Rick Santorum voted YES on the Patriot Act

Rick Santorum was rated 0% by the LCV, indicating that he has no interest in environmental concern

Rick Santorum was rated 25% by the ACLU, meaning that he has an anti-civil rights voting record

… Essentially, Rick Santorum is against helping the citizens of the United States and for helping the corporations of the United States.

Rick Santorum voted YES to raise the debt ceiling five times

Rick Santorum voted YES to the “Bridge to Nowhere.”

Consider this final thought: Is this excerpt of his voting record more important or is his strength of faith more important?

*In no way is this an endorsement for any other Republican candidate as they are all misguided*


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